The Perfect Enemy | Alaska’s reported COVID-19 cases increased by 23% this week
July 7, 2022

Alaska’s reported COVID-19 cases increased by 23% this week

Alaska’s reported COVID-19 cases increased by 23% this week  Anchorage Daily NewsView Full Coverage on Google News

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By Anchorage Daily News

Updated: 3 hours ago Published: 4 hours ago

The number of newly reported COVID-19 cases in Alaska rose by 23% this week compared to last week as hospitalizations decreased slightly.

Here are a few main takeaways from the latest data available from the state Department of Health and Social Services:

• By Wednesday, there were 57 COVID-positive patients hospitalized around Alaska, a slight decrease from the 61 reported by the state a week earlier. Just under 5% of Alaska’s hospital patients were COVID-positive, and no one required a ventilator. Current hospital counts are still well below all-time peaks but higher than at other points in the pandemic.

• The state reported 3,016 cases in Alaska over a seven-day period, an increase from 2,452 cases reported last week. This week’s total includes 2,123 cases among residents and 893 among nonresidents, and averages out to just over 430 cases per day. That data doesn’t include at-home tests.

• Alaska’s seven-day case rate per 100,000 people is seventh highest in the nation as of this week, according to a CDC tracker. Nationally, cases are decreasing slightly.

• The state reported no new deaths linked to the virus. In total, 1,252 COVID-19 deaths among residents and 34 among nonresidents have been reported since March 2020.

• Across the state, 65.3% of Alaskans 5 and up as well as military personnel had completed their primary vaccine series. About 30.9% were considered up-to-date on their vaccinations with at least one booster.

[Children under 5 are eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine, but finding a provider in Alaska may be tricky. Here’s what to know.]

• This week, children and babies as young as 6 months became eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations. Most vaccine appointments for very young children and babies will need to made with primary care providers and pediatricians.

• Pharmacies can vaccinate children 3 and older, and some communities around the state may be offering public clinics, many of which will be posted online at vaccines.gov, a federal website that allows users to search by AIP code for providers offering COVID-19 vaccines near them.

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