The Perfect Enemy | Penn State Health pediatrician recommends COVID-19 vaccine for infants, preschoolers
July 7, 2022

Penn State Health pediatrician recommends COVID-19 vaccine for infants, preschoolers

Penn State Health pediatrician recommends COVID-19 vaccine for infants, preschoolers  WGAL Susquehanna Valley Pa.View Full Coverage on Google News

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The Food and Drug Administration on Friday authorized the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines for emergency use in children as young as six months.Now all eyes are on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as shots cannot go into arms until its vaccine advisers vote Saturday on whether they recommend them.”Penn State Health will have these available as soon as they are approved from the CDC,” pediatrician Dr. Patrick Gavigan said. Moderna produced a two-dose regimen, with shots given four weeks apart. Each dose is a quarter of the adult dose. Pfizer created a three-dose regimen. The second shot is given three weeks after the first dose, and the third shot is given eight weeks after the second. Each dose is one-tenth the adult dose. “Both vaccines seem to be extremely safe based off of the studies from Moderna and Pfizer,” Gavigan said.According to Gavigan, the most common side effects from both vaccines include pain at the injection site, fussiness, loss of appetite and sleepiness. “Side effects seem mild and in line with what we see with other routine pediatric vaccines,” he said.Gavigan said even though rates of severe disease or death from COVID-19 are lower in children, it is still worth getting the shot. The shots will not only protect the youngest kids, he said, but also help stop community spread of the virus. “With the rates of infection where they are right now, I think getting that protection on board as soon as possible makes sense,” he said.For that reason, Gavigan recommends getting kids vaccinated as soon as the shots are available, instead of waiting for the start of the school year. “We would urge everyone to get in contact with their pediatrician about scheduling those vaccinations,” he said.

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday authorized the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines for emergency use in children as young as six months.

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Now all eyes are on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as shots cannot go into arms until its vaccine advisers vote Saturday on whether they recommend them.

“Penn State Health will have these available as soon as they are approved from the CDC,” pediatrician Dr. Patrick Gavigan said.

Moderna produced a two-dose regimen, with shots given four weeks apart. Each dose is a quarter of the adult dose.

Pfizer created a three-dose regimen. The second shot is given three weeks after the first dose, and the third shot is given eight weeks after the second. Each dose is one-tenth the adult dose.

“Both vaccines seem to be extremely safe based off of the studies from Moderna and Pfizer,” Gavigan said.

According to Gavigan, the most common side effects from both vaccines include pain at the injection site, fussiness, loss of appetite and sleepiness.

“Side effects seem mild and in line with what we see with other routine pediatric vaccines,” he said.

Gavigan said even though rates of severe disease or death from COVID-19 are lower in children, it is still worth getting the shot.

The shots will not only protect the youngest kids, he said, but also help stop community spread of the virus.

“With the rates of infection where they are right now, I think getting that protection on board as soon as possible makes sense,” he said.

For that reason, Gavigan recommends getting kids vaccinated as soon as the shots are available, instead of waiting for the start of the school year.

“We would urge everyone to get in contact with their pediatrician about scheduling those vaccinations,” he said.