The Perfect Enemy | Fact-checking claim by Gov. Ron DeSantis: Are you more likely to get COVID-19 if you’ve had multiple booster shots?
August 11, 2022

Fact-checking claim by Gov. Ron DeSantis: Are you more likely to get COVID-19 if you’ve had multiple booster shots?

Fact-checking claim by Gov. Ron DeSantis: Are you more likely to get COVID-19 if you’ve had multiple booster shots?  WJXT News4JAX View Full Coverage on Google News

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News4JAX ran a statement Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis made through the Trust Index.

While speaking to a crowd in Osceola County on Tuesday night, DeSantis said that you are more likely to get infected with COVID-19 if you get multiple booster shots, based on the data he has reviewed.

″I think if you look at the data now, people who have had multiple boosters are actually more likely to get infected right now,” DeSantis said at the Florida Sheriffs Association 2022 Summer Conference Awards Banquet.

News4JAX contacted the governor’s office to find out what data DeSantis was referring to when he said that COVID-19 booster shots make you more susceptible to catching the coronavirus, but we haven’t heard back about the source of the governor’s information.

We did, however, talk with two medical professionals, both of whom say the governor’s statement is misleading. And one of them says he knows the source of DeSantis’ information.

“It was from Walgreens, from their testing centers they test in their stores,” said Dr. Todd Husty, an emergency medical specialist.

Husty says DeSantis is making big claims based on small datasets recently released from Walgreens pharmacies. Husty says the number of people who test positive for COVID-19 at Walgreens after getting their booster shots doesn’t accurately represent the number of Floridians affected by COVID-19.

“You can’t take an isolated data set like that and then make this big glowing statement of, obviously, that means that vaccines don’t work and they make you more susceptible. It wasn’t that kind of data. It wasn’t good enough to do that,” Husty said. “And even Walgreens has come out and said you can’t make a conclusion from this data, it’s not conclusive data.”

We also took DeSantis’ claim to epidemiologist Jonathan Kantor who had this to say about the governor’s allegation: “Yeah, I think it’s absolutely not the case that, you know, for your average person, if you get extra boosters, you’re more likely to get COVID. There is, you know, mechanistically no way that that is going to be really making sense.”

Kantor says people who get COVID-19 boosters are more likely to get tested in an environment where COVID-19 reporting is taking place, pointing to the thousands of people who are testing positive at home and not reporting their illness to anyone.

“So I don’t think that drawing conclusions from the tiny fraction of people that we’re seeing right now who are getting tested in a pharmacy or in the testing center is really appropriate,” Kantor said.

Husty said, “I understand politics get into things, you know, in medicine, and we’ve had a lot of politics in COVID, and I find it a shame.”

So to DeSantis’ claim that “people who have had multiple boosters are actually more likely to get infected right now,” the Trust Index team gives this statement a rating of not true.

According to medical professionals, the governor is making a big statement based on a very small segment of data.

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