The Perfect Enemy | CDC gives approval of COVID-19 vaccine for children as young as 6 months
July 5, 2022

CDC gives approval of COVID-19 vaccine for children as young as 6 months

CDC gives approval of COVID-19 vaccine for children as young as 6 months  WTAE PittsburghView Full Coverage on Google News

Read Time:4 Minute

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave the green light for infants, toddlers and preschoolers to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Advisers to the CDC recommended the vaccines for the littlest children, and the final signoff came hours later on Saturday from Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the agency’s director.“We know millions of parents and caregivers are eager to get their young children vaccinated, and with today’s decision, they can,” Walensky said in a statement.”This is an expected decision, we’ve seen the data trickle out on vaccinations for children under the age of five and all the data looks good. This is a vaccine that has a good safety profile,” said infectious disease and critical care physician Dr. Amesh Adalja.Pfizer’s vaccine for kids younger than 5 is one-tenth of the adult dose. Three shots are needed: the first two given three weeks apart and the last at least two months later.Moderna’s is two shots, each a quarter of its adult dose, given about four weeks apart for kids under 6. “I would recommend children that are six months and above to get this vaccine because, even if they’re spared from severe consequences of disease and children are less likely to have severe disease from COVID this is an infection that causes problems,” Adalja told Pittsburgh’s Action News 4. ” It causes hospitalizations, it causes people to be sick and home from school, it causes them to have a disruption to their life. You have a safe and effective vaccine that can prevent all of that so, I do think this is something I would encourage parents to get for their children.”Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 spoke with parents to see if they’d consider getting the vaccine for their little ones.”I don’t think it’s good for children. I’d rather her wear a face mask then giving her the vaccine,” said Nathan Hardy. “(It’s been) two years now, and I’ve never caught it, my kids never caught it, so I don’t think we need it.””I am considering giving (my 3-year-old) the vaccine because, she was born with a metabolic disorder,” Amanda Gordon shared with Pittsburgh’s Action News 4. “Knowing if she gets sick, we can be in the hospital for quite some time, I think giving her the COVID vaccine would be a good thing for her and my family.”Adalja said while he recommends the vaccine, he doesn’t anticipate a high number of people taking their children to get it.”If you look at the 5 to 11 (age group) who’ve had access to the vaccine for several months, only about 30% of them are fully vaccinated. So, I suspect we’re going to be seeing numbers probably lower than that,” he said. The first shipments of the vaccines are expected this weekend and will be available to the public on Tuesday, after the federal holiday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave the green light for infants, toddlers and preschoolers to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Advisers to the CDC recommended the vaccines for the littlest children, and the final signoff came hours later on Saturday from Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the agency’s director.

Advertisement

“We know millions of parents and caregivers are eager to get their young children vaccinated, and with today’s decision, they can,” Walensky said in a statement.

“This is an expected decision, we’ve seen the data trickle out on vaccinations for children under the age of five and all the data looks good. This is a vaccine that has a good safety profile,” said infectious disease and critical care physician Dr. Amesh Adalja.

Pfizer’s vaccine for kids younger than 5 is one-tenth of the adult dose. Three shots are needed: the first two given three weeks apart and the last at least two months later.

Moderna’s is two shots, each a quarter of its adult dose, given about four weeks apart for kids under 6.

“I would recommend children that are six months and above to get this vaccine because, even if they’re spared from severe consequences of disease and children are less likely to have severe disease from COVID this is an infection that causes problems,” Adalja told Pittsburgh’s Action News 4. ” It causes hospitalizations, it causes people to be sick and home from school, it causes them to have a disruption to their life. You have a safe and effective vaccine that can prevent all of that so, I do think this is something I would encourage parents to get for their children.”

Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 spoke with parents to see if they’d consider getting the vaccine for their little ones.

“I don’t think it’s good for children. I’d rather her wear a face mask then giving her the vaccine,” said Nathan Hardy. “(It’s been) two years now, and I’ve never caught it, my kids never caught it, so I don’t think we need it.”

“I am considering giving (my 3-year-old) the vaccine because, she was born with a metabolic disorder,” Amanda Gordon shared with Pittsburgh’s Action News 4. “Knowing if she gets sick, we can be in the hospital for quite some time, I think giving her the COVID vaccine would be a good thing for her and my family.”

Adalja said while he recommends the vaccine, he doesn’t anticipate a high number of people taking their children to get it.

“If you look at the 5 to 11 (age group) who’ve had access to the vaccine for several months, only about 30% of them are fully vaccinated. So, I suspect we’re going to be seeing numbers probably lower than that,” he said.

The first shipments of the vaccines are expected this weekend and will be available to the public on Tuesday, after the federal holiday.