The Perfect Enemy | Boris Johnson will be forced out by autumn without ‘positive new agenda’, Lord Frost says – UK politics live
July 7, 2022

Boris Johnson will be forced out by autumn without ‘positive new agenda’, Lord Frost says – UK politics live

Boris Johnson will be forced out by autumn without ‘positive new agenda’, Lord Frost says – UK politics live  The Guardian

Read Time:34 Minute

Covid-19 infections in the UK have risen for the first time in two months, with the jump likely caused by increases in cases compatible with the original Omicron variant BA.1 and the newer variants BA.4 and BA.5, according to the Office for National Statistics.

As PA Media reports, a total of 989,800 people in private households are estimated to have had the virus last week, up from 953,900 the previous week.

All four nations have seen a rise in infections, though the ONS describes the trend in Scotland and Wales as “uncertain”. It says:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}There were early signs of a possible increase in the percentage of people testing positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) in England and Northern Ireland likely caused by increases in infections compatible with Omicron variants BA.1, BA.4 and BA.5; the trends were uncertain in Wales and Scotland.

Here are the country by country figures for how many people are estimated to have been infected in the week ending last Thursday.

England – one person in 70

Wales – one person in 75

Northern Ireland – one person in 65

Scotland – one person in 40

As the BBC’s Mark Easton reports, the UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, has told the high court that it considers Priti Patel’s plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda to be illegal.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Lawyers seeking an injunction stopping the deportation of asylum seekers to Rwanda say @ukhomeoffice claims the policy fully complies with international law is 'incorrect'. @UNHCR has warned the deal runs 'counter to the letter and spirit' of the Refugee Convention.

&mdash; Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCMarkEaston/status/1535229705846239232","id":"1535229705846239232","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"ea3ba7c4-9f01-4de2-8de7-0129ee7d75a7"}}”>

Lawyers seeking an injunction stopping the deportation of asylum seekers to Rwanda say @ukhomeoffice claims the policy fully complies with international law is ‘incorrect’. @UNHCR has warned the deal runs ‘counter to the letter and spirit’ of the Refugee Convention.

— Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

A barrister for the UN refugee agency, Laura Dubinsky QC, told the court that “in light of inaccuracies” she wanted to clarify that the UNHCR in no way endorsed the UK-Rwanda arrangement.
She said the UNHCR had informed the home secretary that it was unlawful.

&mdash; Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCMarkEaston/status/1535230111078916097","id":"1535230111078916097","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"03a8de42-6d37-473c-9e5d-3934c293239b"}}”>

A barrister for the UN refugee agency, Laura Dubinsky QC, told the court that “in light of inaccuracies” she wanted to clarify that the UNHCR in no way endorsed the UK-Rwanda arrangement.
She said the UNHCR had informed the home secretary that it was unlawful.

— Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

United Nations refugee officials warned the Home Office twice after the announcement of the deal to remove asylum seekers to Rwanda that the process was unlawful, the High Court has heard.

&mdash; Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCMarkEaston/status/1535232076533858304","id":"1535232076533858304","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"adc18ced-7135-4f32-a598-a35d85b2fb2c"}}”>

United Nations refugee officials warned the Home Office twice after the announcement of the deal to remove asylum seekers to Rwanda that the process was unlawful, the High Court has heard.

— Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

This is from Detention Action, one of the groups seeking the injunction to stop next week’s removals.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

🚨BREAKING🚨 #UNHCR have intervened in our High Court hearing, with
&quot;Serious concerns that asylum seekers transferred from the UK to Rwanda will not have access to fair &amp; efficient procedures… with consequent risks of (being returned to persecution).”https://t.co/3nZdt34Onn

&mdash; Detention Action (@DetentionAction) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/DetentionAction/status/1535232959015534594","id":"1535232959015534594","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"b8284996-6dbd-4348-a8ed-d6c1ae37713c"}}”>

🚨BREAKING🚨 #UNHCR have intervened in our High Court hearing, with
“Serious concerns that asylum seekers transferred from the UK to Rwanda will not have access to fair & efficient procedures… with consequent risks of (being returned to persecution).”https://t.co/3nZdt34Onn

— Detention Action (@DetentionAction) June 10, 2022

At the Telegraph Charles Hymas has this quote from the UNHCR submission to the court. The UNHCR said:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}The UK-Rwanda arrangement fails to meet the required standards relating to the legality and appropriateness of bilateral or multilateral transfers of asylum-seekers.

This arrangement, which amongst other concerns seeks to shift responsibility and lacks necessary safeguards, is incompatible with the letter and spirit of the 1951 Convention.

In UNHCR’s view, the UK-Rwanda arrangement cannot be brought into line with international legal obligations through minor adjustments.

The serious concerns outlined in the present analysis require urgent and appropriate consideration by the governments of the UK and Rwanda in line with their obligations under well-established and binding norms of international refugee law.

PA Media has more from what the high court was told this morning by Raza Husain QC, the lawyer representing the asylum seekers facing deportation to Rwanda next week. (See 11.29am.) Here are some of his arguments.

  • Husain said that the Home Office claim that Rwanda was a safe destination for the asylum seekers was “irrational”.
  • He said the Home Office case was “misleading” because it implied the UNHCR (UN high commissioner for refugees) supported the Rwanda plan, when this was not true. Husain said the UNHCR had a number of concerns about the asylum process in Rwanda, including discriminatory access to asylum – including for LGBT people – a lack of legal representation and interpreters, and difficulties in appealing. He went on:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}These are concerns that have been communicated to the UK authorities and yet the secretary of state’s position … is that the UNHCR has given this plan a green light. That is a false claim.

  • He said the asylum procedure in Rwanda was not safe.
  • He said the Home Office should be operating on the basis of evidence, “not an aspirational basis, or hopes”.

And here are some more lines from the Downing Street lobby briefing.

  • Downing Street said the claim that the Treasury had wasted £11bn by not insuring against interest rate rises (see 12.18pm) was based on an “implausible assumption”. The No 10 spokesperson said:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}Forcing commercial banks to swap reserves for gilts undermines the independence of the Bank of England and would be an act of financial repression. And the £11bn figure itself is based on an implausible assumption.

The spokesperson also urged journalists to read the Twitter thread from John Glen, the Treasury minister, dismissing the FT story. (See 12.18pm.)

  • The spokesperson played down complaints that the plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda is not yet having a deterrent effect on small boat Channel crossings, saying that the government did not expect the full impact of the policy to be seen until it had been rolled out fully.
  • The spokesperson said the government would publish a summary of its legal advice about the bill allowing parts of the Northern Ireland protocol to be abandoned when the bill is published on Monday. The government claims the bill will not breach international law, but many lawyers believe otherwise.
  • The spokesperson refused to say whether Boris Johnson considers himself a good role model for children. Asked about the claim from the chair of the social mobility commission that he isn’t a good role model, the spokeperson just said Johnson was focused on the issues he set out in his speech yesterday.

At the Downing Street lobby briefing the No 10 spokesperson said Boris Johnson was “appalled” by the death sentences handed to Aiden Aslin and Shaun Pinner, and has ordered ministers to do “everything in their power” to secure their release. The spokesperson said:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}The prime minister was appalled at the sentencing of these men. He has been following the case closely and has asked ministers to do everything in their power to try and reunite them with their families as soon as we can. We completely condemn the sham sentencing of these men to death. There’s no justification at all for this breach of the protection they’re entitled to.

And Liz Truss has just posted this on Twitter, about her conversation with her Ukrainian opposite number about the two prisoners of war.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Spoke with Ukrainian FM @DmytroKuleba to discuss efforts to secure the release of prisoners of war held by Russian proxies. The judgement against them is an egregious breach of the Geneva convention.

The UK continues to back Ukraine against Putin’s barbaric invasion. pic.twitter.com/DyKZAP4HA6

&mdash; Liz Truss (@trussliz) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/trussliz/status/1535222331756396545","id":"1535222331756396545","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"5bcb9ae6-b397-43df-8bf6-0d574f1e95f0"}}”>

Spoke with Ukrainian FM @DmytroKuleba to discuss efforts to secure the release of prisoners of war held by Russian proxies. The judgement against them is an egregious breach of the Geneva convention.

The UK continues to back Ukraine against Putin’s barbaric invasion. pic.twitter.com/DyKZAP4HA6

— Liz Truss (@trussliz) June 10, 2022

There is much more coverage of this story on our Ukraine war live blog.

John Glen, a Treasury minister, has rejected claims that the Treasury wasted £11bn by paying too much interest on government debt. The claim was “not true”, he said.

He also said the suggestion that the £11bn cost could have been avoided (in very simple terms, by insuring against an interest rate increase – although the mechansim for that would be very complicated) was reliant on a strategy carrying “huge economic risks”.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

The Treasury has inaccurately been accused of wasting billions of pounds. This is not true and the proposed measures come with huge economic risks and could undermine the Bank of England’s independence.

A short thread:

&mdash; John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/JohnGlenUK/status/1535203393974988800","id":"1535203393974988800","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"2d8e8444-6721-44ff-b63e-75a8b698a870"}}”>

The Treasury has inaccurately been accused of wasting billions of pounds. This is not true and the proposed measures come with huge economic risks and could undermine the Bank of England’s independence.

A short thread:

— John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

The Bank of England sets monetary policy independently – a fundamental feature of the UK’s macroeconomic framework. The proposals published today would undermine this independence, and be an act of financial repression.

This would be hugely damaging to the UK’s economy.

&mdash; John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/JohnGlenUK/status/1535203395749003266","id":"1535203395749003266","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"769c205e-a976-4653-bf85-1aa6bb15eac9"}}”>

The Bank of England sets monetary policy independently – a fundamental feature of the UK’s macroeconomic framework. The proposals published today would undermine this independence, and be an act of financial repression.

This would be hugely damaging to the UK’s economy.

— John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

The proposals are complicated and involve forcing banks to swap reserves for longer-dated securities, but the £11 billion figure itself is based on almost impossible scenarios and implementing the proposals would have a significant impact on market prices and credibility.

&mdash; John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/JohnGlenUK/status/1535203397028265984","id":"1535203397028265984","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"fa272c4a-0699-4c75-93bb-b3570d73a848"}}”>

The proposals are complicated and involve forcing banks to swap reserves for longer-dated securities, but the £11 billion figure itself is based on almost impossible scenarios and implementing the proposals would have a significant impact on market prices and credibility.

— John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

This Government has always managed the economy responsibly and carefully, and respected the independence of the Bank of England completely. This will always be the case.

&mdash; John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/JohnGlenUK/status/1535203398311624706","id":"1535203398311624706","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"b9619f0d-dd11-41d7-97d9-48769e26a03e"}}”>

This Government has always managed the economy responsibly and carefully, and respected the independence of the Bank of England completely. This will always be the case.

— John Glen MP (@JohnGlenUK) June 10, 2022

The claim that £11bn was wasted is based on an analysis by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) thinktank which was written by by the Financial Times this morning as its splash.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Friday’s Financial Times: “Sunak lost £11bn of taxpayer cash in debt blunder, say economists”#tomorrowspaperstoday pic.twitter.com/rFoDFP8GYP

&mdash; Helena Wilkinson (@BBCHelena) June 9, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCHelena/status/1534990625589936131","id":"1534990625589936131","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"58915879-2939-4611-be77-652bb19a96f3"}}”>

Friday’s Financial Times: “Sunak lost £11bn of taxpayer cash in debt blunder, say economists”#tomorrowspaperstoday pic.twitter.com/rFoDFP8GYP

— Helena Wilkinson (@BBCHelena) June 9, 2022

In a Twitter thread, Chris Giles, the FT’s economics editor, who wrote the story, said the threat posed by rising interest rates was real, and that the government could have done more to mitigate the risk. But he admits that following the approach suggested by the NIESR might not have worked, or might have created alternative problems. His thread starts here.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Our splash on debt management and @NIESRorg calculating an £11bn loss for taxpayers has raised important issues today – here are some thoughts on the implications…

I would note this is complicated and simplification was required to tell the tale

1/https://t.co/sRp5zK6LT6

&mdash; Chris Giles (@ChrisGiles_) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/ChrisGiles_/status/1535200362256384002","id":"1535200362256384002","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"cd904492-d32c-4b09-b8a9-ec898c0273b9"}}”>

Our splash on debt management and @NIESRorg calculating an £11bn loss for taxpayers has raised important issues today – here are some thoughts on the implications…

I would note this is complicated and simplification was required to tell the tale

1/https://t.co/sRp5zK6LT6

— Chris Giles (@ChrisGiles_) June 10, 2022

Ministers have announced plans to open up to 75 new free schools in England. There will be up to 15 new mainstream schools and up to 60 special schools, for pupils with special educational needs, or alternative provision (AP) schools, for pupils who have been excluded, or who are at risk of exclusion.

Robin Walker, the schools minister, told LBC this morning that there would be a particular focus on funding standalone sixth forms in disadvantaged areas. He said:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}This is extra places in new schools, so fundamentally what we’re talking about here is where there is a real need for new schools, whether that is in mainstream or whether it’s in the specialist sector, we want to make sure we are meeting that need.

Demographically, we’ve been through a bit of a bulge and there’s not perhaps the huge expansion of need for schools in mainstream that we’ve had in previous years.

But we are seeing, particularly in some areas of disadvantage where there isn’t opportunity for people to progress post-16, we want to fill that gap, we want to make sure that there’s the opportunity for everybody to have the chance to study, to go to university, should they choose to do so, or pursue vocational routes such as T-levels.

And these are from the BBC’s home and legal correspondent, Dominic Casciani, on the high court hearing this morning on the proposed removal of asylum seekers to Rwanda.


<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

So far: Around 100 people have been told they might be put on a flight. Three of those, taking part in today’s action, have now been told by the Home Office, they won’t be sent to Rwanda at this time.

&mdash; Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCDomC/status/1535202010248712193","id":"1535202010248712193","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"fa0be4c2-0454-47ed-b27f-30c997449519"}}”>

So far: Around 100 people have been told they might be put on a flight. Three of those, taking part in today’s action, have now been told by the Home Office, they won’t be sent to Rwanda at this time.

— Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

The Home Office has told the court that the claim brought against the Rwanda policy, by charities and other campaigners and lawyers for individual asylum seekers, should fail because it’s not justified – and the plan is in the public interest to deter English Channel crossings.

&mdash; Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCDomC/status/1535202012194869249","id":"1535202012194869249","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"3fab8fd1-0287-4fae-acce-1085e548e797"}}”>

The Home Office has told the court that the claim brought against the Rwanda policy, by charities and other campaigners and lawyers for individual asylum seekers, should fail because it’s not justified – and the plan is in the public interest to deter English Channel crossings.

— Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Raza Hussain QC, for some of the claimants, has told the court that the Home Secretary (usually legal-speak for the Home Office in general) have misled the court – and there is no support for the Rwanda plan from the United Nations Refugee Agency.

&mdash; Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCDomC/status/1535203259341688833","id":"1535203259341688833","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"108041e7-9b3d-4ff6-9b1b-76f74f588fe3"}}”>

Raza Hussain QC, for some of the claimants, has told the court that the Home Secretary (usually legal-speak for the Home Office in general) have misled the court – and there is no support for the Rwanda plan from the United Nations Refugee Agency.

— Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Mr Hussain said: “The Secretary of State’s assessment of the safety of Rwanda and her response is replete with references to UNHCR and the suggestion that the UNHCR has given this plan a green light. Regrettably the material demonstrates that to be misleading and incorrect.”

&mdash; Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCDomC/status/1535203261757763585","id":"1535203261757763585","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"46399028-d558-44f7-a54f-695583594c52"}}”>

Mr Hussain said: “The Secretary of State’s assessment of the safety of Rwanda and her response is replete with references to UNHCR and the suggestion that the UNHCR has given this plan a green light. Regrettably the material demonstrates that to be misleading and incorrect.”

— Dominic Casciani (@BBCDomC) June 10, 2022

The Home Office has not said how many asylum seekers it wants to deport to Rwanda next week and it has not denied reports the number could be as high as 130. But the Guardian has been told the number is around 30.

The Home Office has said that it has cancelled orders for the removal of three asylum seekers who were due to be sent to Rwanda next week, PA Media reports. The department said the removal directions had been cancelled in a written submission to the hearing at the high court this morning (see 9.44am), where campaigners are trying to get an injunction to suspend the removals.

Mark Easton from the BBC says one asylum seeker is still fighting his removal in this hearing.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Three asylum seekers due to have been deported to Rwanda next Tuesday will NOT now be removed, @ukhomeoffice has revealed. The trio were among four migrants challenging their deportation in the High Court. Another asylum seeker is still fighting his removal.

&mdash; Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/BBCMarkEaston/status/1535198158082433029","id":"1535198158082433029","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"5ab861ab-b0a6-4571-9de0-ed9cfb29f52e"}}”>

Three asylum seekers due to have been deported to Rwanda next Tuesday will NOT now be removed, @ukhomeoffice has revealed. The trio were among four migrants challenging their deportation in the High Court. Another asylum seeker is still fighting his removal.

— Mark Easton (@BBCMarkEaston) June 10, 2022

Katharine Birbalsingh, the government’s social mobility tsar, has said she does not think Boris Johnson is a good role model for children. In an interview with Sky News, asked if he was a good role model, she replied:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}No, I don’t think so. I wish he could be but he isn’t and that is a bit sad.

I like Boris, I don’t think he’s a bad guy.

I don’t know enough about what he’s got up to but I do not think that he is a good role model for children.

The other day I saw a picture of him in the Metro and I looked at his hair and I thought – oh my goodness – we expect our children to have professional-looking hair.

You might think that’s a bit pedantic and that’s a bit silly, but it isn’t actually. I think, for our children, it’s important to look professional. And sometimes Boris looks professional, but sometimes he’s not professional enough for me.

My collleague Jamie Grierson has the full story here.

Katharine Birbalsingh.

The average price of a litre of petrol at UK forecourts reached a new record of 183.2p on Thursday, according to data firm Experian, PA Media reports. PA says:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}That was an increase of 0.9p compared with Wednesday.

This means the average cost of filling a typical 55-litre family car is £100.76.

The average price of a litre of diesel on Thursday was a record 188.8p.

The controversial legislation to override the Northern Ireland protocol will be published on Monday after a row between the government and Eurosceptics about whether it is tough enough, my colleague Rowena Mason reports.

The legal commentator David Allen Green has written a long and interesting blog in which he unpicks the controversy about whether or not the first treasury counsel, Sir James Eadie, was consulted about the legislation. Here is Green’s conclusion.

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}What appears to have happened is as follows: the government got its convenient advice from the current attorney general; somebody insisted that this still had to be referred to first treasury counsel; a clever compromise was reached where it would be referred to Eadie on the basis of certain assumptions, so as not to undermine the convenient legal advice; and the [Eadie], while accepting those assumptions, provided an unhelpful view on the merits of those assumptions.

Keir Starmer arriving at Stormont in Northern Ireland this morning for talks with party leaders.

The Office for National Statistics has released a report today showing the extent to which British people are worried about the cost of living. Here are some of the main findings.

  • More than three quarters of adults (77%) feel very or somewhat worried about the rising cost of living, the ONS says.
  • Those most likely to be very or somewhat worried about the rising cost of living are women (81% – the figure for men is 73%), people aged between 30 and 49 (82%), disabled people (82%) and parents with a child under four (90%).
% of people worried about the rising cost of living - by age
% of people worried about rising cost of living - amongst disabled and non-disabled
% of people worried about rising cost of living - by parental status
  • Levels of worry about the cost of living are broadly similar in income groups up to £40,000 per year. But even among people earning more than £50,000 a year, 12% are very worrried about the cost of living, and 57% somewhat worried.
% concerned about the cost of living - by income
  • Half of adults very worried about the rising cost of living feel worried about this nearly every day.
How often people worry about cost of living

These are from ITV’s Anushka Asthana ahead of the high court hearing this morning where campaigners will be seeking an injunction to stop the deportation of asylum seekers to Rwanda next week.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Thread on Rwanda policy latest: Will be heading to the High Court today- as @DetentionAction @Care4Calais &amp; others inc 4 individuals being sent to Rwanda request injunction to ground next week’s flight until all legal arguments have been made. @AsylumAid also requesting inj 1/

&mdash; Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/AnushkaAsthana/status/1535164629449691142","id":"1535164629449691142","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"72a772a7-749e-4c4b-9c6c-7574921a8181"}}”>

Thread on Rwanda policy latest: Will be heading to the High Court today- as @DetentionAction @Care4Calais & others inc 4 individuals being sent to Rwanda request injunction to ground next week’s flight until all legal arguments have been made. @AsylumAid also requesting inj 1/

— Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Their legal argument-that they are asking for time to complete-is that Priti Patel hasn’t proven Rwanda is a safe place to send asylum seekers (eg cos of claims around human rights in detention) &amp; protection for asylum seekers from being returned where they are fleeing from 2/

&mdash; Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/AnushkaAsthana/status/1535165611613069318","id":"1535165611613069318","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"b7fd512a-3b31-4b8a-b376-07d233bd9c9b"}}”>

Their legal argument-that they are asking for time to complete-is that Priti Patel hasn’t proven Rwanda is a safe place to send asylum seekers (eg cos of claims around human rights in detention) & protection for asylum seekers from being returned where they are fleeing from 2/

— Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Priti Patel has said from the start that lawyers (she said “leftie lawyers”) would try to block the plan. But that her department had done all the legal work to take on those challenges 3/

&mdash; Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/AnushkaAsthana/status/1535168499647229953","id":"1535168499647229953","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"2211b343-008f-4a88-856f-77e9a975cca3"}}”>

Priti Patel has said from the start that lawyers (she said “leftie lawyers”) would try to block the plan. But that her department had done all the legal work to take on those challenges 3/

— Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

The government believes this policy will act as a deterrent to other people trying to cross the Channel by boat. And it’s v popular among a lot but not all Tory MPs. Charities have argued it’s inhumane. 4/

&mdash; Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/AnushkaAsthana/status/1535169105753526272","id":"1535169105753526272","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"66837b15-cab7-4b79-bde3-5aff6dbe47dc"}}”>

The government believes this policy will act as a deterrent to other people trying to cross the Channel by boat. And it’s v popular among a lot but not all Tory MPs. Charities have argued it’s inhumane. 4/

— Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) June 10, 2022

And here is our preview story by Rajeev Syal and Diane Taylor.

Good morning. Boris Johnson is expected to be campaigning in Tiverton and Honiton in Devon today, where in a fortnight’s time voters will be hearing the result of the byelection. The Lib Dems are now widely expected to win, and if they do, overturning a Tory majority of more than 24,000, it will be a dire blow to the Tories, even worse than the loss of North Shropshire, where the government majority was just under 23,000. It is not clear yet what Johnson might be doing in the constituency, but it would be nice to think that he will bump into the woman my colleague Peter Walker met when he was there yesterday.

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

Tiverton voters have a refreshing bluntness. What do you think of Boris Johnson, I ask a woman in her 70s. “Crap”. What did you think of him in 2019? “Crap, but a bit less crap.”

&mdash; Peter Walker (@peterwalker99) June 9, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/peterwalker99/status/1534891030490800130","id":"1534891030490800130","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"b14e9725-42c0-429b-b892-fb4c06401e77"}}”>

Tiverton voters have a refreshing bluntness. What do you think of Boris Johnson, I ask a woman in her 70s. “Crap”. What did you think of him in 2019? “Crap, but a bit less crap.”

— Peter Walker (@peterwalker99) June 9, 2022

<gu-island name="TweetBlockComponent" deferuntil="visible" props="{"element":{"_type":"model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TweetBlockElement","html":"

I’ve transcribed the (brief) tape of my chat with Tiverton’s most concisely eloquent woman. Other highlights:
“Neil Parish? Disgusting.”
Have you decided how you’ll vote? “Yes”.
Will you tell me? “No”.
Will it involve trying to unseat the Tories? “Definitely”.

&mdash; Peter Walker (@peterwalker99) June 9, 2022

n","url":"https://twitter.com/peterwalker99/status/1534926640253476864","id":"1534926640253476864","hasMedia":false,"role":"inline","isThirdPartyTracking":false,"source":"Twitter","elementId":"67a86426-526d-48f6-ab22-a157e559856b"}}”>

I’ve transcribed the (brief) tape of my chat with Tiverton’s most concisely eloquent woman. Other highlights:
“Neil Parish? Disgusting.”
Have you decided how you’ll vote? “Yes”.
Will you tell me? “No”.
Will it involve trying to unseat the Tories? “Definitely”.

— Peter Walker (@peterwalker99) June 9, 2022

Some Tories and commenatators think that the loss of Tiverton and Honiton (and also Wakefield, where there is another byelection on the same day) might trigger a fresh Tory attempt to remove Johnson. But this seems unlikely, since the party will still be less than three weeks on from the last no-confidence vote, and instead party conference in the autumn (and/or the publication of the privileges committee inquiry into claims Johnson lied to MPs about Partygate – possibly coming at roughly the same time) is being seen by some as the new deadline by which Johnson must either get a grip or face removal from office.

In an article for the Daily Telegraph today Lord Frost, the former Brexit minister who at one point was close to Johnson, delivers this warning explicitly. He says that, if Johnson wants to survive, he must embrace an authentic deregulatory, low-tax, Brexity agenda. He explains:

.css-knbk2a{height:1em;width:1.5em;margin-right:3px;vertical-align:baseline;fill:#C70000;}The investigation by the committee of privileges is still ongoing – it could easily come to some difficult conclusions and [Johnson] will face real problems if MPs, the party, and our voters can’t by then see a new positive agenda that would justify sticking with him as prime minister.

“Getting on with the job”, as he said at this week’s Cabinet, will not be enough if the new job is the same as the old job. If it is, the new boss will not be the same as the old boss …

Every prime minister has weaknesses and blind spots. The issue is whether they are able to compensate for them, by having the right people, by taking good advice, and by setting a clear policy direction with broad support. Mr Johnson probably has between now and the party conference to show he can do that.

The main concern I hear from party members and potential Tory voters is not about partygate. For good or ill, people have made up their minds about that. It is that they don’t understand what the government is trying to do, and why. Worse, to the extent that they do understand it, they don’t particularly like it. They get that the government faces many difficult problems. They are willing to cut it some slack. But they want to know how it is going to try to solve them and they want it to do so in a Conservative way, not in a high-cost high-spend collectivist way.

Frost spend most of his career as a middle-ranking diplomat, and he was a lobbyist for the Scotch Whisky industry before Johnson, then foreign secretary, made him an adviser. Now he has acquired a status where he is presented (particularly by the Telegraph) as the conscience of Conservatism. It is a striking transformation but one that is flattering for Frost, as well as the convenient for the paper, which is now increasingly critical of Johnson and happy to use the peer to champion an agenda it also shares.

Here is the agenda for the day.

10.30am: Lawyers launch a bid at the high court to stop the deportation of asylum seekers to Rwanda.

11.30am: Downing Street holds a lobby briefing.

At some point Johnson is expected to be campaign in Tiverton and Honiton.

And Keir Starmer is in Belfast, where he is meeting political figures to discuss the Northern Ireland protocol.

I try to monitor the comments below the line (BTL) but it is impossible to read them all. If you have a direct question, do include “Andrew” in it somewhere and I’m more likely to find it. I do try to answer questions, and if they are of general interest, I will post the question and reply above the line (ATL), although I can’t promise to do this for everyone.

If you want to attract my attention quickly, it is probably better to use Twitter. I’m on @AndrewSparrow.

Alternatively, you can email me at andrew.sparrow@theguardian.com